Newsletter 23rd March 2013

http://us2.campaign-archive2.com/?u=22dc050b415f7b7ab31543d28&id=4beaea5599 Includes : Canberra concert information, SMH article link ‘The Fire & the Fury’, interview with Tim Powles + links to iTunes, ReverbNation etc  

http://us2.campaign-archive2.com/?u=22dc050b415f7b7ab31543d28&id=4beaea5599

Includes : Canberra concert information, SMH article link ‘The Fire & the Fury’, interview with Tim Powles + links to iTunes, ReverbNation etc

 

Rockin’ the capital – March 11 2013

the church will headline a concert in Canberra next month, the 11th of March, as part of the capital’s 100th birthday celebrations. This is a free open air event around Lake Burley Griffin on the Regatta Point stage. The concert will commence around 4pm on the Regatta Point stage and continue into the night. This stage will pay tribute to a perhaps unexpected aspect of our nation’s capital: a rich history of original contemporary music. A display of rock history and memorabilia will show that Canberra is home to far more than politics. The program of entertainment will include the church and reformed Canberra bands such as The Gadflys, The Falling Joys, 78 Saab and Machine Translations. http://www.oneverybigday.com.au/program/regatta-point-stage/ http://www.canberra100.com.au/calendar/view/486/regatta-point-stage/ The George Ellis Centennial Ensemble http://www.oneverybigday.com.au/program/for-kids/ “In the early afternoon, the audience is invited to participate with a group of professional orchestral musicians on stage by teaching them a simple tune from the Under The Milky Way chorus by the church. Everyone can join in with voice or play their own instruments brought to the concert. Then perform the song in entirety with Steve Kilbey singing – the audience, on cue, play the pre-learned melody at the appropriate place in the choruses”

Bimbadgen

the church will headline a concert in Canberra next month, the 11th of March, as part of the capital’s 100th birthday celebrations. This is a free open air event around Lake Burley Griffin on the Regatta Point stage. The concert will commence around 4pm on the Regatta Point stage and continue into the night. This stage will pay tribute to a perhaps unexpected aspect of our nation’s capital: a rich history of original contemporary music. A display of rock history and memorabilia will show that Canberra is home to far more than politics. The program of entertainment will include the church and reformed Canberra bands such as The Gadflys, The Falling Joys, 78 Saab and Machine Translations.

http://www.oneverybigday.com.au/program/regatta-point-stage/

http://www.canberra100.com.au/calendar/view/486/regatta-point-stage/

the church

The George Ellis Centennial Ensemble

http://www.oneverybigday.com.au/program/for-kids/

“In the early afternoon, the audience is invited to participate with a group of professional orchestral musicians on stage by teaching them a simple tune from the Under The Milky Way chorus by the church. Everyone can join in with voice or play their own instruments brought to the concert. Then perform the song in entirety with Steve Kilbey singing – the audience, on cue, play the pre-learned melody at the appropriate place in the choruses”

time gentlemen time

ok mystery guest artist may or may not arrive tomorrow lets hope so i’m all set to go 1 2 3 have  done a rehearsal for musical reprising in melbourne in march during the festival of suburbia am almost finished doing a re-mix of a kil/ken song called “i find” my first ever re-mix…not as easy as i first thought you got all the bits n pieces n you can assemble any way you like so much choice no responsibility at all just do whatever you like you think itd be easy wouldnt you it is i guess if you just do the usual old thing… meanwhile my concert with george ellis n orchestra is set for 21 sept. i will also be doing something with george n ork at canberra gig 11 march the church will be there too (cue strains of the last time ) the idyllist should be with you soon i apologise for the delays i am very happy with the response so far..believe me… so next up is the extraordinary “you are everything” when you hear it you will know what i mean unlike the hodgepodge nature of idyllism you are everything is a deep hard blast of seriously “heavy” music nothing jolly or breezy here you will  find intensity brilliance darkness and light from the beginning to the end holding you rapt it is not anything like what went before with albums one or two here we emerge as equal masters of our domains martins music and what he has achieved here is stunning …. no one saw this coming certainly not me these huge epic songs epic in their solitary quiet spirituality or their orchestrated grandeur more low/bowie/eno influence that german sound and feeling have my words ever been better? my voice more […]

boom sha la la lo

boom sha la la lo

ok

mystery guest artist may or may not arrive tomorrow

lets hope so

i’m all set to go 1 2 3

have  done a rehearsal for musical reprising in melbourne in march

during the festival of suburbia

am almost finished doing a re-mix of a kil/ken song called “i find”

my first ever re-mix…not as easy as i first thought

you got all the bits n pieces n you can assemble any way you like

so much choice

no responsibility at all

just do whatever you like

you think itd be easy wouldnt you

it is i guess if you just do the usual old thing…

meanwhile my concert with george ellis n orchestra is set for 21 sept.

i will also be doing something with george n ork at canberra gig 11 march

the church will be there too

(cue strains of the last time )

the idyllist should be with you soon

i apologise for the delays

i am very happy with the response so far..believe me…

so next up is the extraordinary “you are everything”

when you hear it you will know what i mean

unlike the hodgepodge nature of idyllism

you are everything is a deep hard blast of seriously “heavy” music

nothing jolly or breezy here

you will  find intensity brilliance darkness and light

from the beginning to the end holding you rapt

it is not anything like what went before with albums one or two

here we emerge as equal masters of our domains

martins music and what he has achieved here is stunning ….

no one saw this coming certainly not me these huge epic songs

epic in their solitary quiet spirituality or their orchestrated grandeur

more low/bowie/eno influence that german sound and feeling

have my words ever been better? my voice more smooth and sometimes more chilling?

the melodies the arrangements the intent

you are everything

in a new league of its own

probably one of the best 3 records i ever worked on

i dont say it lightly!

elegant elegiac modern classic strange

turbulent disturbed and yet so fucking lovely

yeah i know i can blow my own horn

but just wait till you hear this

an album of pop songs yes and much much more than that

an album that charts the struggle of the soul

an album of fragility regret and repentance

an album of top class numbers every single on of em

so thats coming

april i believe with show in melbourne too

and …

yeah…

i’ll keep you all informed as it all starts to pan out

sk

 

 

Desert wind in a telephone box …..

“it dials my numbers up it picks my locks picks his kind To go and mingle in my mind” – lyrics from Cobalt Blue – Untitled #23 album

426426_10150548849587759_648822758_9081178_902114217_n-002

“it dials my numbers up
it picks my locks
picks his kind
To go and mingle in my mind” – lyrics from Cobalt Blue – Untitled #23 album

426426_10150548849587759_648822758_9081178_902114217_n-002

lotta stuff coming up

sorry the cds are all on their whey there was an unforeseen delay but theyre coming atcha the idyllist in yer mailbox coming through your door your postie knock knock package for you sign here please i apologise for the hold up next week i hope to start on a new collaboration with someone i’m not gonna say who it is until they get here but i’m excited but you never know in showbiz do ya? and things can go wrong at anytime i got so much on the boil sometimes i cant think that straight still to come are coral kingdom n hu dost collabs both works in progress kil/ken is looming large you will be surprised by this record i guarantee it and of 21st of september i am doing a solo show with orchestra in sydney thats with george ellis from OH days i’m writing painting working try to stay moving my rib is still hurting having xray tomorrow wrote 2 cool new pieces of music quite unusual i blah blah blah ok?  

Photo on 12-02-13 at 9.01 PM
white pastel pencil

white pastel pencil

sorry the cds are all on their whey

there was an unforeseen delay but theyre coming atcha

the idyllist in yer mailbox

coming through your door

your postie knock knock package for you sign here please

i apologise for the hold up

next week i hope to start on a new collaboration with someone

i’m not gonna say who it is until they get here but i’m excited

but you never know in showbiz do ya?

and things can go wrong at anytime

i got so much on the boil

sometimes i cant think that straight

still to come are coral kingdom n hu dost collabs both works in progress

kil/ken is looming large

you will be surprised by this record i guarantee it

and of 21st of september i am doing a solo show with orchestra in sydney

thats with george ellis from OH days

i’m writing painting working

try to stay moving

my rib is still hurting having xray tomorrow

wrote 2 cool new pieces of music quite unusual

i blah blah blah

ok?

 

not idle

here is a new video featuring music by me photos by RB hope you enjoy  

here is a new video featuring

music by me

photos by RB

hope you enjoy

 

Verging on Vinyl : Review of Untitled #23

Day Thirty-Eight: The Church – Untitled #23 8th Feb 2013 http://vovinyl.blogspot.com.au/2013/02/day-thirty-eight-church-untitled-23.html  “Back when I wrote about Burning Airlines’ Identikit, I decided to be a smartypants and ask J. Robbins and Peter Moffett for opinions on where to go with that entry, and got different responses from each. It did, however, help to decide which release to go with that time. When I started planning ahead for my next polls (after the onslaught around artists starting with “B”) I saw that I had the Church in the running. I actually typed up that poll (Untitled #23 vs. Starfish) and then decided that, since he had actually passed along my previous writing about the Church (now and forever the most popular post on that blog, as a result!), I would ask Steve Kilbey for input here. After doing so, I started pondering asking Marty Willson-Piper, and maybe even Peter Koppes, just to get a well-rounded set of responses, if I could, but I was surprised to get a response from Mr. Kilbey almost immediately. Without any demands, he simply told me he’d prefer I write about Untitled #23, without question (as I had asked specifically if he had a preference). When that response came in, I thought about it. I realized that, most likely, he said this because, well, if there’s a Church album people know about–it’s Starfish. It seemed, then, like it would be the right thing in all senses to follow his wishes. I took down the poll (few if any even saw it), and marked Untitled #23 for writing today. I’ve already written about how I stumbled into the Church (the link above will take you there, if you are curious), so I’ll go ahead and leave it at the most barebones note possible. The portion of it which relates to this very entry is as follows: while I knew […]

Day Thirty-Eight: The Church – Untitled #23
8th Feb 2013

http://vovinyl.blogspot.com.au/2013/02/day-thirty-eight-church-untitled-23.html

 “Back when I wrote about Burning Airlines’ Identikit, I decided to be a smartypants and ask J. Robbins and Peter Moffett for opinions on where to go with that entry, and got different responses from each. It did, however, help to decide which release to go with that time. When I started planning ahead for my next polls (after the onslaught around artists starting with “B”) I saw that I had the Church in the running. I actually typed up that poll (Untitled #23 vs. Starfish) and then decided that, since he had actually passed along my previous writing about the Church (now and forever the most popular post on that blog, as a result!), I would ask Steve Kilbey for input here. After doing so, I started pondering asking Marty Willson-Piper, and maybe even Peter Koppes, just to get a well-rounded set of responses, if I could, but I was surprised to get a response from Mr. Kilbey almost immediately. Without any demands, he simply told me he’d prefer I write about Untitled #23, without question (as I had asked specifically if he had a preference). When that response came in, I thought about it. I realized that, most likely, he said this because, well, if there’s a Church album people know about–it’s Starfish. It seemed, then, like it would be the right thing in all senses to follow his wishes. I took down the poll (few if any even saw it), and marked Untitled #23 for writing today.
I’ve already written about how I stumbled into the Church (the link above will take you there, if you are curious), so I’ll go ahead and leave it at the most barebones note possible. The portion of it which relates to this very entry is as follows: while I knew their biggest single, I stumbled into some of their most recent work a decade ago by chance, and this was my most expansive introduction, and informed my understanding of how the band sounds almost more emphatically than even the song that was thoroughly ingrained in my head. It was a sound appropriate for my musical tastes at the time–I was deeply into post rock, and the sounds that lay within albums like After Everything Now This were not far off from that same sensibility.
Untitled #23, as a record, is a major variation on the album as it was released on CD. The three tracks I marked with an asterisk (*) above are not present on the CD version, and were released as the B-sides on the Pangaea EP. The order is also quite significantly shifted, with former closer “Operetta” moved to the end of Side Two, and “Space Saviour” shifted forward a full seven tracks–amongst other things. This does make for a bit of a change of pace, but the tracklisting’s overall changes, compared to just dropping the extra tracks at the end, work where they lay (or lie, I’m not too sure).
Steady, clear, patient drumming begins the album in “Cobalt Blue”, a gentle electronic noise fading in, before Steve Kilbey’s voice enters, guitars¹ shortly following and chord-based, one moving higher but holding with the other. “To go and mingle in my mind”, Kilbey sings, and his voice echoes and drifts upward, pulled back down as the bass enters. Acting as counter to the guitars and giving them a brighter feel, the bass expands the range of the song itself, filling out the lower end where it had been left clear for the opening. Each time Kilbey’s voice floats off into scattering reflections, there’s a sense of a soft light spreading across the track, though after one occurrence about halfway through it takes the guitars with it, and leaves a woodwind sound that is just a bit darker, shadows falling where we just saw light. A mumble of distant voices rises up under this as a solo manifests slowly; it’s not the kind that defies the work around it, or elevates its tone or feeling to another one, it expands on the existing mood, a mix of light and softened darkness. The drums walks the track out with four easy snare hits, two pauses, and four more. Despite the snare emphasis, it’s not a march, though, it’s a normal step, one that walks us gently into “Deadman’s Hand”.
Far more uptempo, but in no way suddenly upbeat, “Deadman’s Hand” is relentlessly catchy. The riff it comes in on is distorted, but the kind that eats at the edges of the sound, rather than explicitly defining it. It’s a dark, lower-pitched kind of riff, though it doesn’t have a downward motion to it: it’s more like the kind of sound that might once have stuck the band with the label “gothic” (which has happened), but is more, perhaps, Gothic, than it is “gothic rock”–the sense of wizened or aged darkness, rather than a simple implication of deliberately depressing material. Frank Kearns adds a 12-string ring over the top of this, one that adds to this sense, despite the tendency for 12-strings to often cheer things up. When Kilbey begins singing, it’s with his normal voice, but tempered with a clever production move that changes it in spite of itself: he’s singing gently, but with the lightest “echo” that gives it an extremely ethereal quality. That “echo” is other voices here, of course, doubtless those of Marty or Peter (or both), but so subdued as to sound like shadows of Kilbey’s own. It’s a weird feeling: the drumming is uptempo, but the overall sound manages to catch itself at either end, turning it into some kind of catchy pop/rock song filtered through a drain on the most energetic elements.
The last track in its original placement, “Pangaea” begins to introduce us to the sounds that permeate the rest of the album: the first moments are a blend of mixed sounds, including touches of harp from Patti Hood and scattered notes from multiple guitars. A 12-string and bass gently bring everything together as a light cymbal wash marks the actual change. Gently strumming 12-string, thumping bassline–the song is a wash of sound, accented by backing vocals that “Oooh” gently and prettily behind Steve’s voice, which has regained its usual edge: a certain sharpness to the baritone that is incredibly distinct, that enunciates clearly, yet with a sort of catch to this that is unbelievably appropriate for their music. It all feels like a spread of sound, warm and soft, with Kilbey’s sharpened voice cutting at it, as he sings, “You’ve got your hands/’Round my throat/You’ve got your voice/In my head”, a haunting response from the others adds, “No matter what”, his threats suddenly softened by the chorus: “Pangaea…” the edge dropped and the last syllable turned to a pretty little wave. The 12-string suddenly takes over, sliding expertly through a solo that runs counter to the staid cello of Sophie Glasson.
Moved from near the end of the album, “Anchorage” is langorous compared to the preceding tracks, but the wandering, subdued keys seem to pull it upward somewhat, small points of light dotting the sliding drums, the downed guitars that blend perfectly with the keys, the lower end balanced between the mournful draw of Glasson’s cello and the almost upbeat bassline. “Just the way the dead have felt/Nothing like the way my name is spelt/But I belt it out anyway” Steve sings, the serrations emphasized, defiant, as roaring distorted electrics build the track over huge drums and splash, the wave only a small one. Scattered electronic noises are left in its wake, as the track goes on, a guitar taking off on its own to make its point, not taking it past an extended lead. The lyrics are constructed as defiant and pained, but are mostly delivered in defiance, expressing the pain with more aggression than hurt. Harmonized briefly, it’s like others carrying Steve’s defiance up when it might falter. Alongside them, a blazing guitar and then another wave, this one much larger–but it backs away, too, and this time leaves a quite chorale, the sliding tick of hi-hat emphasized drumming and a hummingbird-heart bassline. If it weren’t so eloquently sung and performed, it would be like a monologue to the absent, spoken with the openness and pride of a drunk, but the awareness, the consistency make it, instead, heartfelt admission and confession.
“Happenstance” makes for a rather curious song: at first that clean and clear biting winter wind of Kilbey’s voice and steadily strummed 12-string, tom-heavy drums and sliding bass–but then the upward curve of a higher tone turns it to something almost sunny, as Kilbey intones “Happenstance…” with just a touch of variation in each channel to give a fuller dimension to the sound. Near a whisper, Willson-Piper breathily adds a voice almost like a memory to this interruption, before that shine of lazy sun fans across it again. The trading voices of Steve and Marty, and the shining final peak of sound gives the song a feeling of relaxation almost narrated by both the present and the past.
Clanging bells and a soft buzz call “Sunken Sun” into place, though the song itself is an expansion of the sound of “Happenstance”, warm and easy resignation created with a guitar that climbs up, curious, to land on a ringing chord that is warm but expansive. As a line ends and a drum beat sounds, an operatic keyboard voice holds over empty space, ringing, echoing guitar that strikes with a sustained bass note falls across it, until it all hushes and returns to the calmness of the opening. One of the most striking solos on the album meanders in near the end of the track, never showing off at all, just growing naturally from the space it is left, often holding notes for extended periods, rather than cramming as many in as possible. It’s a beautifully organic extension of the song’s tone. The song fades off with those echoing guitar chords, clear and bright, but balanced by their companion chord into a sort of pained recollection of happy memory.
The first track to appear on the vinyl and not on the CD, “LLC” was given lyrics (and vocals) by Peter Koppes (as opposed to the usual Kilbey). A fantastic oscillating 12-string melody is the anchor of the song as a whole, and runs through all but . Much cheerier than anything previous (allegedly the cause for keeping the track off the album originally), it shifts into a predictive bridge and then a more steady chorus, before returning to that delightful 12-string run. A subtle lead holds and blends behind it, only taking real control at the very end with a rapid, twisting outro.
Originally the album’s closer, “Operetta” oddly fits in the same way as closer for Side Two and thus half the album. Strong keys and gently waving guitar eases the song into place, a seemingly endless sustain and echo on the spaced guitar chords emphasize the feeling of ends, of the music filtering out into the expanses. Overlapped, harmonized vocals and deep, low keys mark the chorus, like all preceding sounds and voices coming together by design to tie things together. This is how the song ends, too, slowly losing each layer until it is left as just a bending bass and drums, fading to nothing.
“On Angel Street” manages the neat trick of continuing without a lost beat from a track that could have ended the album. A long-held bass note accentuates a series of repeated keyboard notes and a wandering guitar. When Steve’s voice is added to this, it’s the sound of a singer alone, the keys keeping a full musicality in place, but making apparent the ambient nature of the song. The sounds are almost like blinking lights or quiet warning sirens, a backing to the voice that doesn’t imply furthered sentience or emotional presence, even as their slow shift between notes creates the emotional sense of the song. Wavering and wailing guitar leads come and enter like ghosts–beautiful but transient. That this does not end up coming off like a novelty, or an interlude, or some other kind of “fluff” is some kind of amazing.
Previously the penultimate track, “Lunar” has shifted backward only slightly (unless one counts running time). A lone woodwind starts the track as vaguely pastoral, a huge wash of ringing cymbal and the slow, resonating guitar chords setting up the slightly backed-up voice of Steve, thumping drums hinting at what is to come when a bassline filled with energy and activity absent from the other instruments comes in, churning the low end and attempting to push life into the adjacent instruments in their slowed tempos. It’s ineffective and everything falls away to a an echo-laden voice from Steve, on beat instruments, and then it seems to gain life, only to leave nothing but the woodwinds alone in its wake again.
“Insanity” is the other track that let’s Kilbey’s voice rest, as Marty Willson-Piper takes over, confident guitars stepping in ahead of the rest of the band, though when he begins singing–“It’s just insanity,” the operative word is “just”: it has a shrug to it, as if to suggest that there’s nothing to be concerned about. It works upward with each line, releasing at the end of them. It’s cheerier, even as it does not move any more rapidly. This isn’t to say it’s actually cheerful, it’s just not as…Romantic (that capital “R” is intentional). Marty’s voice goes vaguely Dylan-like, as he suggests the possibility that maybe it doesn’t make sense to ascribe the ways of the world to a divine plan, that it’s easier to see it as all random, and anything else might be, well…²
Oh, the guitar that opens “Space Saviour”; it carries just the right tone and effects, the slight watered sound and firm pull of the strings making it viscerally appealing without requiring or exhibiting the kind of feeling that a blues-inflected kind might. The steady on-beat guitar chords form a simple backing as Steve sings with the kind of voice that feels like he’s pushing it with as much power as he can–not volume, mind you, just force. The thumping four beats on drum matched with gradually opening splash are the perfect crescendo of repetition for the repeated needs of Kilbey’s words: “And I’ve gotta get up/And I’ve gotta get on/And I’ve gotta get off/And I’ve gotta get out…” When they fall away, the opening riff returns, and the drums turn to the thump and hi-hat of anticipatory restraint, as Kilbey intones calmly, gradually building back to that huge and determined parallel repetition. The song finally splinters and spreads, before leaving itself, to a watery, circling guitar that plays alone for just a moment before being left to hang.
When I noted that “Lunar” was only briefly re-arranged but with a qualifier, “So Love May Find Us” was, in essence, the entirey of that qualification. “So Love May Find Us” has a 17:48 runtime, and…I’m not sure I could, in good faith, attempt to walk anyone through it. This is not the kind of lengthy track that’s arranged around droning repetition for atmosphere, nor constant builds toward huge moments (like “Atom Heart Mother” does), nor cobbled together songs. It’s too well designed to feel like a completely improvised jam, especially with those tasty guitars in the first few minutes, shot out only every few moments, strong and clear, and hinting at a future threat. The drumming is controlled and low at the start, jazzy and interesting, burning quietly with the promise of future expanse. Eventually it begins to rumble, a solo of immense and unusual nature placing itself like a flag at the first third, marking the moment at which Glasson’s cello and Michael Bridge’s violin take precedent. For a short time, the song is more ambient than anything else, the bass drawing Steve’s voice back in with keys, before the drums finally fulfill the promise laid out earlier–not huge and aggressive, just free-wheeling and free-ranging, hi-hat traded for ride, fills and rolls eventually morphing into the standing beat. The song seems to end, hovering on ride, slowing keys, choral backing–but the bass draws it back in, the ride increasing in power, but easing off as the song shifts into a continued downtempo phrasing, ending with an excellent drum pass and a final wavering, splintering fade off.
The Church are often plagued by that comment: “Wait, the one from the 80s?” and there’s really no quality justification for it. They’ve released music with some regularity since that time, even as they’ve wobbled around the centrepoints that are Marty and Steve, Koppes taking a brief hiatus in the 90s. Their work has been generally well-regarded in all this time, even outside the fanbase. Untitled #23 was hailed as a supreme work, and justifiably so. This album is stunningly beautiful. It carries sounds you could ascribe to sources like post rock, yet when you try to pin them down, you realize it’s only a faint reminder. Neither treading their own water, nor anyone else’s, they’ve evolved steadily over the years within the very wide boundaries of their own sound. Bands with long histories often suffer obnoxious repetition of commentary–I’ve seen members of Pere Ubu incensed that their new album is not so much reviewed badly, as reviewed poorly, always referencing thirty year old albums as if that’s the only touchstone for a professional review, despite consistent releases all the way through now. They complained, too, of “Wow, they can still rock…” comments, which are similarly useless.
I suppose I could estimate how old the members of the Church were in 2009, but it doesn’t really matter. It isn’t impressive that anyone can still play at any age, nor that they can play well. It isn’t impressive that a band just isn’t releasing dreck after nearly thirty years either. What is impressive is the strength of identity in an album released almost 29 years after their first single. There’s no sense of struggling to maintain an established sound, or of flailing wildly for an entirely new one. No sense of tired, uncomfortable, should-have-retired-but-just-won’t recycling or cashing in. If a new band had released this work out of nowhere, it would be stunning. If any other long established band had released this work after a long hiatus, or even after working steadily, it would be stunning. And so this is: it’s not the sound of finally realized maturity, or of experimentation finally succeeding at re-lighting torches, it’s the sound of honed quality.
There’s no easy word for the tone that pervades this album, even with the addition of Peter and Marty’s “happier” songs (“Insanity” and “LLC”), which actually fit quite well within the whole, perhaps because of the tempering of “So Love May Find Us”. It’s the sound of the Church: not “goth”, but wise, lean, artful, and clear, with enough darkness that a casual look might relegate them (again) to goth. The album art–Marty’s photos, and the design of his significant other, Tiare Helberg and Guppy Art’s Rachel Gutek–is brilliantly perfect. It’s the kind of design and image that you can get lost in alongside the music. It’s simple and clean, all deep rust and cross-hatched off-white, but a close looks shows you thick, peeling paint and cracked walls. The interior is more of the same: the way the off white left side jumps out from the dark red of the exterior, the way the thick, peeling pale red of the right moves against it–it’s nothing at all and everything at once, whatever you want, need, or feel it to be, because it doesn’t openly declare anything about the music contained. The nonchalant font, the ambiguous (or plain) title, the lack of uppercase on the exterior, it’s brilliant for preventing preconceived notions.
This isn’t an album to have a big happy dance party to, no. And, while you could take it as a possibly uneasy lullaby, it has so much energy despite the slower tempos that it remains engaging, and perhaps more engaging than much of music is. I found myself completely aware but closing my eyes throughout listening, a feeling almost like waking during a solo in “So Love May Find Us”, yet bewildered as I could recall everything I had heard up to that point in the piece, as if it has nearly hypnotized me. It’s too at ease with itself to feel overly contrived, yet too tight to feel lazy and random.
I could question the fact that this album has not made “the rounds” of the music community, but nothing is so simple as quality imbuing a work with legs. And that’s a truly unfortunate truth.
¹I am normally inclined to ascribe names to instruments, but they traded up enough on this album that I’m simply not going to bother, except where guests appear (who are specifically credit to instruments on tracks!)
²As I’m sometimes wary of misheard words, I decided to peruse lyrical transcriptions of “Insanity” and found someone who managed to completely ignore the clear moments that define these aspects: “And it’s full of holes, this Holy Bible” became “And it’s full of holes is your only rival”, and “unless it’s just a myth and” to “and let’s just admit that”. It almost looks like censoring, or willful refusal. For a moment, I thought I’d imagined things, but, no, that’s definitely what he’s singing. And, strangely–these are the only transcriptions I can find. I do sometimes wonder about people… ” – by R.C. Killian

 

i cant wait till i have some patience

saturday afternoon in bondi becalmed warm grey windy day think of old times think of the past think of the band think about music a door opens to a warm rainy summer somewhere then but it can never take me back in memory fade slow burn out to pure white in negative black no avail no avail girls clomph thru bondi in high wedge shoes they look like galloping hippopotami as they race up Campbell Parade hailing a cab the place is packed with cars ice cream chips fish gulls swimmers kids dogs bouncers spruikers deadbeats hippies spaniards swedes by the bucketload yibber yabbering up Hall Street cops and beggars and looneys and saints inside the shops do the jostle buy a slurpee or  a surfboard or board shorts or wetsuit you want thai food haircut manicure pilates tattoo? you want frozen yoghurt gelato full cream haagen norgen NZ ice? you want cigs wigs coats clothes bikinis wax brazilian mexican vietnamese ? you want hustler fumbler crook and society bitch in her black land crusher 4wd you want surfer graffiti skater biker bikie surfie grommet and boob jobs? you want botox shots parking ticket bottle shops prams tourists ? you want celebrities nobodies somebodies has beens never was? you want salt sand umbrellas pines palms g-strings tits n ass? you want cafe bar restaurant brunch tapas aioli rocket boutique beer? you want phony flaky lousy silly awful funny curious blase fucked up? you want real estate agent and waverley council ranger? you want one way street you want eternal construction machine? you want home renovation all around the street and wild parties? you want rich man poor man bored man thief? or what? me …i just dont care at all…  

orange as warm

orange as warm

saturday afternoon in bondi becalmed

warm grey windy day

think of old times think of the past

think of the band think about music

a door opens to a warm rainy summer somewhere then

but it can never take me back in

memory fade slow burn out to pure white in negative black

no avail no avail

girls clomph thru bondi in high wedge shoes

they look like galloping hippopotami

as they race up Campbell Parade hailing a cab

the place is packed with cars ice cream chips fish gulls swimmers

kids dogs bouncers spruikers deadbeats hippies spaniards

swedes by the bucketload yibber yabbering up Hall Street

cops and beggars and looneys and saints

inside the shops do the jostle

buy a slurpee or  a surfboard or board shorts or wetsuit

you want thai food haircut manicure pilates tattoo?

you want frozen yoghurt gelato full cream haagen norgen NZ ice?

you want cigs wigs coats clothes bikinis wax brazilian mexican vietnamese ?

you want hustler fumbler crook and society bitch in her black land crusher 4wd

you want surfer graffiti skater biker bikie surfie grommet and boob jobs?

you want botox shots parking ticket bottle shops prams tourists ?

you want celebrities nobodies somebodies has beens never was?

you want salt sand umbrellas pines palms g-strings tits n ass?

you want cafe bar restaurant brunch tapas aioli rocket boutique beer?

you want phony flaky lousy silly awful funny curious blase fucked up?

you want real estate agent and waverley council ranger?

you want one way street you want eternal construction machine?

you want home renovation all around the street and wild parties?

you want rich man poor man bored man thief?

or what?

me …i just dont care at all…

 

final thoughts on the idyllist

Final thoughts on the idyllist Oh boy I gotta lotta on my plate so I wont linger longer on idyllist So much happening all at once you see Now my internets down n I’m writing this in “word” So that accounts for all the fucking capitals n stuff Anyway the machine knows better than me what I want to write Ok idyllist is a sprawling drawling mélange A hodge podge of all the music I ever heard baby n then some Its un-apollo-getically eclectic There is no theme no rhyme or reason In that it reminds me of todd by todd rundgren A tour-de-force of a slightly unhinged nutty genius just running amok Ie one song does not prepare you for the next One mans variety is another mans lack of continuity I guess That’s the funny thing with me I manage to be right n wrong at same time being Ok so I just listened to the cd up loud Theres some glaring brilliant bits and some brilliantly glaring bits Theres a few sonic problems here and there Theres a few bum notes Theres a few things too loud a few things too soft Things that shoulda been but were…uh…yeah you get the picture..i know its Kilbey its his solo album what would you expect fucking TOTO? Its raw its earthy its undisciplined its loose its ragged Its spontaneous its silly its dopey its comi-tragedy Orchestras barge in outta nowhere Strange foreign instruments pop up all over the place All the little jingly things tap away 12 string strum strum strum typical of yer sk stuff as always was from 1977 I always strumming my twelve you know so well my listeners Usually never far away from sk and his song Theres that simple bass impudently insistent bullying every […]

Photo on 7-02-13 at 9.12 PM #2
Photo on 7-02-13 at 9.12 PM #2
see dee

see dee

Final thoughts on the idyllist

Oh boy I gotta lotta on my plate so I wont linger longer on idyllist

So much happening all at once you see

Now my internets down n I’m writing this in “word”

So that accounts for all the fucking capitals n stuff

Anyway the machine knows better than me what I want to write

Ok idyllist is a sprawling drawling mélange

A hodge podge of all the music I ever heard baby n then some

Its un-apollo-getically eclectic

There is no theme no rhyme or reason

In that it reminds me of todd by todd rundgren

A tour-de-force of a slightly unhinged nutty genius just running amok

Ie one song does not prepare you for the next

One mans variety is another mans lack of continuity I guess

That’s the funny thing with me I manage to be right n wrong at same time being

Ok so I just listened to the cd up loud

Theres some glaring brilliant bits and some brilliantly glaring bits

Theres a few sonic problems here and there

Theres a few bum notes

Theres a few things too loud a few things too soft

Things that shoulda been but were…uh…yeah you get the picture..i know

its Kilbey its his solo album what would you expect fucking TOTO?

Its raw its earthy its undisciplined its loose its ragged

Its spontaneous its silly its dopey its comi-tragedy

Orchestras barge in outta nowhere

Strange foreign instruments pop up all over the place

All the little jingly things tap away

12 string strum strum strum

typical of yer sk stuff as always was from 1977

I always strumming my twelve you know so well my listeners

Usually never far away from sk and his song

Theres that simple bass impudently insistent bullying every song

The bass is the subtext

It tells you whats really going on

The e guitars doing my usual scratchy shifty fucked up racquet

Some naively amazing moments when it all goes right

Some glorious collisions when it doesn’t

My bum notes like my chequered past baby

Oh just let it all hang out !

Idyllist grew up and had a life of its own

Its not what I expected

It must have made its self because I cant remember making it now

I don’t know what some of the words are

Its become another one of my albums now

Its probably gotta be one of the best

The banal and accomplished butt heads and dissolve

Suddenly it all seems to mean so much then its gone by next song

It is no ordinary record yet not extraordinary either

It is the beatles Dylan bolan bowie regurgitated thru my eyes

But at some uncontrollable random generation

The ideas all stand next to the other bizarrely juxtaposed

In some songs everything is all woozy lurching

The words are …oh how can I explain…why would I even try..

Nobody writes words like me

It isn’t possible and who would even want to

I stand alone here in my niche

No one will ever replace me as better at doing this

I know that

I have it all under control believe it or newt

And I got more amazing music and collaborations coming atcha

A very exciting project I will announce as soon as confirmed

The next kil/ken is a mindblowing giant of a record

Seriously I love to blow my own cor anglais

But cor blimey “you are everything” is a blockbuster

A deep spiritually wry album full of huge arrangements

Mixed to a pristine yet experimental perfection by s polinski

Quite different to idyllist

Which is a chaotic record compared to that records careful order

I am proud of idyllist tho I cant really take it in anymore

But through all that I know its pretty good

Its indefinable its strange quirky absent minded

Its an interesting record if nothing else

It heralds a kind of new beginning

And it is therefore a fresh start

And I hope with everything I learned

That the next record totally solo will be apokrypha

That elusive and monstrous masterpiece I hear in my head

Certainly there are elements of that here

The outro to truth aint enough etc

Theres some of it on here already

But idyllist is full of light n shade but apok wont be

It will be one incredible thing

This is many scattered things

Look in the end

I like it

How couldn’t you like it?

All those years I should make good records

I sure cant do much else

This is my calling my living my vocation my manifest destiny

Making records and now taking back more control

I sincerely thank those who have already purchased it

We will get it out first thing tomorrow incl posters for lucky hundred

Finally to Thank skp people too who made it possible

Ie alleviating financial pressure enabling me to do this at all

Each one of you is a patron of the arts

That’s it you wont hear anything about it again for a long time

I guarantee it

And the next record is already almost waiting in the wings…

Love sk bondi beach 2013

see dee

see dee

 

wet saturday morning

  still dont know whats going on with anything at all my girlfriend sams dad is going to pass away and shes there with him in brisbane and the way he is going is painful and dreadful it fills one with fear and anxiety i wish a sweet release for this most humble and kind of geezers i cant believe we must die like this there must be another way my dad went suddenly . bang. he was gone no hospitals no morphine no long drawn out agony sam is showing much much grace under pressure i cant believe she is remaining strong and calm therefore i am so proud of her i wish her dad could slip like a silver drop into the great ocean i beseech jesus krsna and buddha to let this man go let everybody off the hook i again thank krsna jesus and buddha (who are one n the same like we all are!) that my dad exited so quickly cos he of all people wouldve hated this …. what truly does it avail us all this jockeying for position n money n power? death is so close to everyone of us! why cant we learn? why cant we (i include me in spades) change our lives ? actualise compassion. be gentle! love each other and everyone death and sorrow all around us yet we live like theres no tomorrow jostling for my place in the heap not noticing until its too late dont bring one tiny bit more misery into my world please i dont need it i am not dealing with people who have a problem with me i confuse people because i’m such a genius n such a fool my sister in law wrote about this the other day that the people […]

Photo on 2-02-13 at 12.29 PM
always surrounded by chicas

always surrounded by chicas

 

still dont know whats going on with anything at all

my girlfriend sams dad is going to pass away

and shes there with him in brisbane

and the way he is going is painful and dreadful

it fills one with fear and anxiety

i wish a sweet release for this most humble and kind of geezers

i cant believe we must die like this

there must be another way

my dad went suddenly . bang. he was gone

no hospitals no morphine no long drawn out agony

sam is showing much much grace under pressure

i cant believe she is remaining strong and calm

therefore i am so proud of her

i wish her dad could slip like a silver drop into the great ocean

i beseech jesus krsna and buddha to let this man go

let everybody off the hook

i again thank krsna jesus and buddha (who are one n the same like we all are!)

that my dad exited so quickly cos he of all people wouldve hated this ….

what truly does it avail us all this jockeying for position n money n power?

death is so close to everyone of us!

why cant we learn?

why cant we (i include me in spades) change our lives ?

actualise compassion. be gentle! love each other and everyone

death and sorrow all around us yet we live like theres no tomorrow

jostling for my place in the heap not noticing until its too late

dont bring one tiny bit more misery into my world please

i dont need it

i am not dealing with people who have a problem with me

i confuse people because i’m such a genius n such a fool

my sister in law wrote about this the other day

that the people on the bus got upset because she was a “dreamy fool”

this world needs more dreamy fools

it needs less busyness and business

the world of men and the world in general

POST SCRIPT
SAMS DAD BILL DIED THIS MORNING AT 4.20 AM SAM WAS HOLDING HIS HAND AS HE SLIPPED AWAY.